Health & Fitness / How to be kinder to yourself

Self-compassion

Format

Email and Facebook Messenger

Time commitment

5 minutes a day for 14 days

Subscribers

1329

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February 25, 2016

Many of us have quite a critical attitude toward ourselves. Some of us might even address ourselves with a harsh, demanding voice inside, constantly reminding ourselves that we’re never good enough. Or telling ourselves "Now, pull yourself together!”.

These are the words we’d never ever say to anyone else, not even to our worst enemy. Are you one of us? Do you ever listen to the voice inside or to how it makes you feel? Self-criticism, researchers have found, can be as stressful as being criticized by someone else.

By practicing self-compassion, you can calm yourself down and cultivate a far more sustainable sense of well-being than the thrive for self-esteem. It does even make you perform better than motivating yourself with your inner critic.

The number of scientific papers on self-compassion has increased exponentially since 2003, when the research was initiated by professor Kristin Neff at the University of Texas. And since Kristin Neff and psychologist Christopher Germer established the program Mindful Self-compassion in 2010, it has spread all over the world. Starting this year, you can become a self-compassion teacher not only in English but in German, Spanish, Chinese and Korean.

In this e-mail course, you will meet these pioneers as a bonus along the way. Swedish author and journalist Agneta Lagercrantz, who has created the Daily Bits of Self-compassion, has interviewed them all: psychology professor Kristin Neff, psychologist and mindfulness instructor Christopher Germer, meditation teacher Tara Brach, MSC- (Mindful Self-compassion) teachers Christine Braehler, Michelle Becker and Steven Hackman. The course is based on Agneta Lagercrantz’s book Self-compassion (in Swedish) and her public talks on the subject.

Sounds interesting?